trip

American Airlines Strips Man Of Unlimited Flight Pass After Racking Up 36 Million Miles

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/american-airlines-strips-man-of-unlimited-flight-pass-after-racking-up-36-million-miles-2012-5

American Airlines airplane

Now bankrupt American Airlines used to offer an incredible — and pricey — perk. Until 2004, $500,000 could buy a lifetime first class travel ticket for any route.

But, according to The Daily Mail, one man is having it revoked after amassing 36 million miles and costing American nearly $1 million a year.

Jack Vroom (yes, that is his real, hilarious name), bought the pass in 1989 and has taken advantage ever since.

He has flown far and wide, sometimes for just a few hours. He took a trip to Milan just to grab a motorcycle exhaust and has gone to London for a quick shopping trip.

One of Mr. Vroom’s more frequent trips was to take a sheet of silver to Gudalajara, Mexico to have belt buckles made. And while his son was in college, he’d fly 2,000 miles every weekend to watch him play football.

But he also helped people. The pass came with a companion seat, so one thing he did with it was fly home AIDS victims so they could stay with their families.

American has deemed that Mr. Vroom’s use of the pass has violated the terms they set forth, which means they can revoke it.

Even with the current financial issues, American expects to continue honoring the passes held by other customers. Mr. Vroom says he believes there are 40 in the world.

 Now check out a fast private plane >

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Thursday, May 10th, 2012 news No Comments

American Airlines Strips Man Of Unlimited Flight Pass After Racking Up 36 Million Miles

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/american-airlines-strips-man-of-unlimited-flight-pass-after-racking-up-36-million-miles-2012-5

American Airlines airplane

Now bankrupt American Airlines used to offer an incredible — and pricey — perk. Until 2004, $500,000 could buy a lifetime first class travel ticket for any route.

But, according to The Daily Mail, one man is having it revoked after amassing 36 million miles and costing American nearly $1 million a year.

Jack Vroom (yes, that is his real, hilarious name), bought the pass in 1989 and has taken advantage ever since.

He has flown far and wide, sometimes for just a few hours. He took a trip to Milan just to grab a motorcycle exhaust and has gone to London for a quick shopping trip.

One of Mr. Vroom’s more frequent trips was to take a sheet of silver to Gudalajara, Mexico to have belt buckles made. And while his son was in college, he’d fly 2,000 miles every weekend to watch him play football.

But he also helped people. The pass came with a companion seat, so one thing he did with it was fly home AIDS victims so they could stay with their families.

American has deemed that Mr. Vroom’s use of the pass has violated the terms they set forth, which means they can revoke it.

Even with the current financial issues, American expects to continue honoring the passes held by other customers. Mr. Vroom says he believes there are 40 in the world.

 Now check out a fast private plane >

Please follow Getting There on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, May 10th, 2012 news No Comments

10 Days After Launch, Plyfe Has 17,000 Users And A Partnership With The United Nations

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/plyfe-launch-2012-3


plyfe Mateen Aini Jeff Arbour

Plyfe is a New York startup that rewards people for engaging with brands on social media. Fueled by $1,000,000 in funding from General Catalyst and the Playfish founding team, it launched 10 days ago and has 17,000 users.

Plyfe is a platform that creates games for brands and helps them interact more with the users they already have. When users play the advertiser’s games, they’re rewarded with tangible gifts. Current prizes include a free trip to Las Vegas via the Tropicana resort.

Brands can create games for free; their task is to encourage users to join Plyfe and play them. Overtime, the Plyfe network will grow and brands will gain access to new engaged users too.  Plyfe plans to generate revenue through research products and lead generation campaigns for advertisers.

Co-founder Jeff Arbour has been in the social media business for a decade. He was the first US employee at The Hyper Factory before it sold to Meredith Corporation.  Now he’s helping consumers get rewarded for all of the data they’re producing online.

A lot of social media rewards companies exist, like CrowdTwist and Badgeville, but Arbour says those are made for the advertisers. Plyfe is a platform that puts consumers first.

“People are giving up a lot of information about themselves online, like where they are, for free,” says Arbour. “We want to give back to them. We reward users for sharing and producing data.”

Next week, the United Nations Foundation and a major animation company are creating Plyfe promotions. Ten more brands will be launching on Plyfe over the next month.

HAULERdeals is currently running a Plyfe promotion. Arbour says it has tripled their Facebook user engagement numbers and grown their total Facebook fans by 10,000. Users have already answered 13,000 questions and viewed videos 3,000 times on Plyfe.

plyfe

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