tweaking

Facebook explains its News Feed post ranking process, rolls out story bumping feature to improve UX

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/08/06/facebook-news-feed-story-bumping/

Facebook explains its News Feed post ranking process, rolls out story bumping feature to improve UX

Have a love/hate relationship with your Facebook news feed? Sure, that feed serves up plenty of photos and posts from friends and family that you want to see, but there are also plenty of posts you could do with out, or posts you wish had been assigned greater importance. Facebook knows this, and is constantly tinkering and iterating its news feed post ranking processes to provide the most relevant stories possible to each individual user. To that end, Facebook’s rolling out a new feature, called story bumping, to better percolate the stuff you care about to the top of your feed. Story bumping has already been launched on the web, and will be rolling out to mobile in the coming weeks.

Previously, Facebook evaluated the most recent posts on the social network by assigning each post a score based upon a series of factors including: number of likes and comments, the relationship between you and the poster, the type of content, etc. Using those signals, Facebook runs them through a proprietary algorithm to determine a post’s score. News feed then displays the posts with the highest score at the top of the feed. However, this method often resulted in relevant posts being relegated below the fold, and those posts would forever be lost in the never-ending social story avalanche. Story bumping provides a way for such posts to be seen by tweaking the recency logic previously used. Instead of picking from the most recent posts, the system now looks for the most recent posts that have not been viewed by the user, so that those older, yet relevant posts get a second crack at showing up in the top of your feed.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, August 6th, 2013 news No Comments

the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/30/follow-the-saga-engadget/

engadget follow the saga the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Over the years, stories have become more than just single bursts of information. These days, there’s as much drama in the consumer technology world as there is sports, politics or your average episode of Days of our Lives. Take SOPA, for example. We’d be remiss of our duties here if we simply reported on what it was, without ever following up on protests, delays, judgments and other vitally important developments. In fact, it’s tough to think of too many stories covered today that don’t correspond with some sort of saga — even the departure of RIM’s co-CEOs represents just a single slice of a far larger tale. For those that follow this stuff 24/7, jumping in at any point in the story is no issue; piecing together the past with the present is second nature. But if you’re actually working during the day, hopping aimlessly into an ongoing saga mid-stream can be downright disorienting. Painful, even. We’ve been working hard to come up with an unobtrusive solution, and we think we’ve found it.

We’ve actually had our Follow The Saga functionality since January of last year — we quietly debuted it with the launch of Verizon’s iPhone 4 — but today’s iteration is far more interactive. We’ve been testing these out over the past few weeks, and today we’re happy to officially introduce them. If you see the badge shown after the break in any post that pops up here at Engadget, just give it a click to be taken to the full saga, and scroll up and down to see related stories before and after the one you happen to ! be looki ng at. We’re hoping it’ll be particularly helpful to those who happen to stumble upon a saga somewhere in the middle, but want to get caught up on what happened prior and where we stand now. As with everything we do, we’ll be continually tweaking and evolving the tool in the months ahead. Enjoy!

Psst… want to see it in action? Have a look under the body of this SOPA post to see how we got to where we are today.

Continue reading Introducing ‘Follow The Saga’: the whole story, regardless of where you jump in

Introducing ‘Follow The Saga’: the whole story, regardless of where you jump in originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Jan 2012 14:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012 news No Comments

Moo.com makes business cards from your Facebook Timeline, strangely offers no Like button on its site

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/05/moo-business-cards-from-your-facebook-timeline/

moo facebook business card Moo.com makes business cards from your Facebook Timeline, strangely offers no Like button on its site

It’s a new year, which probably means that you’re due for new business cards. And look, your card design from last year is precisely that — so last year. Moo has announced a clever new design, which allows you to “take your Facebook Timeline offline, and hand it out to new friends, contacts and potential clients.” Wildly enough, creating ‘em is as easy as tweaking your Timeline. Once you’re ready to roll, just sign in and allow Moo to access your data (cue privacy advocate yelling), check that you spelled your name right and hand over $15 for a stack of 50 cards. Once you receive ‘em, you can navigate back to the site and Like its page as a reward… oh, wait.

Moo.com makes business cards from your Facebook Timeline, strangely offers no Like button on its site originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 05 Jan 2012 17:52:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Pocket-lint, The Verge  |  sourceMoo.com  | Email this | Comments


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, January 5th, 2012 news No Comments

Moo.com makes business cards from your Facebook Timeline, strangely offers no Like button on its site

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/01/05/moo-business-cards-from-your-facebook-timeline/

moo facebook business card Moo.com makes business cards from your Facebook Timeline, strangely offers no Like button on its site

It’s a new year, which probably means that you’re due for new business cards. And look, your card design from last year is precisely that — so last year. Moo has announced a clever new design, which allows you to “take your Facebook Timeline offline, and hand it out to new friends, contacts and potential clients.” Wildly enough, creating ‘em is as easy as tweaking your Timeline. Once you’re ready to roll, just sign in and allow Moo to access your data (cue privacy advocate yelling), check that you spelled your name right and hand over $15 for a stack of 50 cards. Once you receive ‘em, you can navigate back to the site and Like its page as a reward… oh, wait.

Moo.com makes business cards from your Facebook Timeline, strangely offers no Like button on its site originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 05 Jan 2012 17:52:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Pocket-lint, The Verge  |  sourceMoo.com  | Email this | Comments


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, January 5th, 2012 news No Comments

1024-bit RSA encryption cracked by carefully starving CPU of electricity

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2010/03/09/1024-bit-rsa-encryption-cracked-by-carefully-starving-cpu-of-ele/

Since 1977, RSA public-key encryption has protected privacy and verified authenticity when using computers, gadgets and web browsers around the globe, with only the most brutish of brute force efforts (and 1,500 years of processing time) felling its 768-bit variety earlier this year. Now, three eggheads (or Wolverines, as it were) at the University of Michigan claim they can break it simply by tweaking a device’s power supply. By fluctuating the voltage to the CPU such that it generated a single hardware error per clock cycle, they found that they could cause the server to flip single bits of the private key at a time, allowing them to slowly piece together the password. With a small cluster of 81 Pentium 4 chips and 104 hours of processing time, they were able to successfully hack 1024-bit encryption in OpenSSL on a SPARC-based system, without damaging the computer, leaving a single trace or ending human life as we know it. That’s why they’re presenting a paper at the Design, Automation and Test conference this week in Europe, and that’s why — until RSA hopefully fixes the flaw — you should keep a close eye on your server room’s power supply.

1024-bit RSA encryption cracked by carefully starving CPU of electricity originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 09 Mar 2010 02:47:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink p://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/03/04/severe_openssl_vulnerability/“>The Register, TechWorld  |  sourceUniversity of Michigan  | Email this | Comments

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010 news 1 Comment

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

Augustine Fou portrait
http://twitter.com/acfou
Send Tips: tips@go-digital.net
Digital Strategy Consulting
Dr. Augustine Fou LinkedIn Bio
Digital Marketing Slideshares
The Grand Unified Theory of Marketing