visualization

A Guide To Everything Google Has Been Asked To Censor

Source: http://gizmodo.com/a-guide-to-everything-google-has-been-asked-to-censor-624948425

A Guide To Everything Google Has Been Asked To Censor

The internet is all about the free flow of ideas, right? Collaboration! Discourse! Sharing! The day to day reality of what we do online may not always be quite so idealistic and ideologically motivated, but the open underpinnings are there. Except, of course, when they’re not at all. This visualization, published by Sebastian Sadowski, uses Google’s transparency data to visualize all the things the company has been asked to censor.

The governments of many countries routinely ask Google to suppress content across sites like Google Search and YouTube. Reasons range from national security, to suicide promotion, and government criticism. There are also categories for “other” and “reason unspecified.” It’s interesting to see which countries are better or worse than you thought they would be. And check out that little chunk of mint green “reason unspecified” censorship on the U.S. chart. You can get the gist below, but because of the interactivity you really have to explore on visual.ly to see what’s going on. Even though Google’s data are openly available, a chart like this allows you to take everything in quickly because someone did the processing work for you. So no excuses. [Digg]

A Guide To Everything Google Has Been Asked To Censor

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Sunday, June 30th, 2013 news No Comments

A Shimmering, Tweet-Based Langauge Map of NYC

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5985892/a-shimmering-tweet+based-langauge-map-of-nyc

A Shimmering, Tweet-Based Langauge Map of NYCIf you’ve ever wondered which languages are spoken where in NYC, here’s the map for you. This visualization shows exactly which languages are used in tweets across the city.

Put together by James Cheshire, Ed Manley and Oliver O’Brien from University College London, the map builds on 8.5 million tweets, captured between January 2010 and February 2013, which were all analyzed for language content. As you’d expect, it’s quite the melting pot, and the highest concentration of different languages seems to be around the Theatre District and Times Square. Best put that down to tourists, eh? Check out the full, interactive map here.[UCL via Guardian]

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Thursday, February 21st, 2013 news No Comments

This Mind-Boggling Visualization Is The Best Explanation We’ve Seen About How Offshore Tax Shelters Work

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-tax-shelters-work-2012-9

Some brilliant work here from Sarah Ryley, Noreen O’Donnell, Sergio Hernandez and Willem Marx at The Daily, which has a new report and a new animated graphic on how offshore tax shelters work.

Please follow Clusterstock on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

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Sunday, September 23rd, 2012 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5910686/when-people-discuss-android-fragmentation-this-is-what-they-mean

The Overwhelming Android Sprawl, VisualizedYou’ve probably read about Android market fragmentation and wondered just how big a deal it is. This visualization spells out the problem tangentially: there are almost 4,000 unique Android devices out there running a single app available on Play. And only a very few of them run the most recent version.

The image was put together by Open Signal Maps to visualize the distribution of devices using their app. It includes data from 681,900 users, and breaks them down into almost 4,000 devices. Admittedly, that number is artificially high, because custom ROMs report identities differently.

But, the point here is that developing for Android is no longer as straightforward as it once was. With so many devices and an ever-expanding catalog of operating systems to cater for, it’s hardly surprising that Android support is shaky at best. By contrast, a similar image for an iOS app would only feature a handful of devices.

Oh, and if you were wondering, yes, that big green block occupying a ten percent share is the Samsung Galaxy S II. [Open Signal Maps via The Verge]

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Wednesday, May 16th, 2012 Uncategorized No Comments

This Is What Your Wikipedia Edits Look Like

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5495353/this-is-what-your-wikipedia-edits-look-like

Normally I’d file this image under our “what is this” image cache, but as you’ve already clocked, it’s somehow related to our Memory [Forever] theme. Those pretty colors are a visualization of the thousands of Wikipedia edits made by a bot.

It’s not just a one-off visualization for adding to our Tumblrs either. It’s the work of Many Eyes, a website set up by a pair of computer scientists at IBM, to catalog visual representations of data. Looking at the site now, two years after Wired brought it to light and interviewed founder Martin Wattenberg, recent artworks tackle the issue of migration in the US, and cremations.

When asked by Wired back then why he’s so keen to visualize data, Watterberg responded that:

“Language is one of the best data-compression mechanisms we have. The information contained in literature, or even email, encodes our identity as human beings. The entire literary canon may be smaller than what comes out of particle accelerators or models of the human brain, but the meaning coded into words can’t be measured in bytes. It’s deeply compressed. Twelve words from Voltaire can hold a lifetime of experience.”

Wikipedia data remains a favorite for them though, thanks to the “idea of completeness” Watterberg talks about, that even though all the data on Wikipedia equals a terabyte or so, “it’s huge in terms of encompassing human knowledge.” [Many Eyes via Wired]

Memory [Forever] is our week-long consideration of what it really means when our memories, encoded in bits, flow in a million directions, and might truly live forever.

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Wednesday, March 17th, 2010 news No Comments

Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/VXZVXiFgV6Y/tableau-public-brings-your-boring-data-to-life

Windows only: Free application Tableau Public creates beautiful visualizations from your data and lets you publish them to the web, where users can interact with your charts and graphs with live updates.

The video above provides a great overview of how the tool works. Essentially, you import your data into the desktop Windows application, then play around with different charts, graphs, or other options until you find the visualization or visualizations that best fit your data. When you’re happy with what you’ve put together, you can save the outcome to the web, which uploads the charts to the Tableau Public servers. From there you can embed it on any web page YouTube-style), and users can drill down into the data to their heart’s content.

Here’s an example of Tableau Public in action from a post on the Wall Street Journal:

Dashboard at 570
Dashboard at 570

Tableau Public is a free download for Windows, and looks like a great tool to try out next time you’re looking to make your otherwise boring data come to life. Update: Somehow I managed to miss the fact that Tableau Public is only free on a trial basis; its actual price tag is extremely hefty. (Though if you’re a student you can get it for as little as $69.)

Double Update: Actually, looks like Tableau Public is free after all! Straight from the horse’s mouth:

“People can download the free tool and publish their visualizations of their data for free. Tableau Public includes a free desktop product that you can download and use to publish interactive data visualizations to the web. The Tableau Public desktop saves work to the Tableau Public web servers – nothing is saved locally on your computer. All data saved to Tableau Public will be accessible by everyone on the internet, so be sure to work only with [publicly] available (and appropriate) data.

When people want to analyze their private or confidential data (particularly data in data warehouses and other large databases), then they may want to consider our commercial products.”

Tableau Public [via MakeUseOf]

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Monday, March 8th, 2010 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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