wall street journal

drag2share: There Is One Mainstream Brand That Admits To Advertising On Porn Sites

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/oegO64McA0Y/eat24-advertises-on-porn-sites-2013-9

a woman eating grapes

California-based food delivery service Eat24.com was looking to get the word out about its late-night meal offerings without breaking the bank.

Having accepted $0 in venture capital funding, Eat24 needed to find sites to advertise on that drew large traffic numbers, but wouldn’t charge the company high rates to display its ads.

The answer, of course, was porn.

An industry leader like Pornhub brings in 14.9 million unique visitors monthly, according to the tracking site Quantcast. That’s more than the websites for Bloomberg and the Wall Street Journal combined. “A whopping 30% of ALL web traffic is dedicated to adult sites,” the company claims.

The catch is that a brand that advertises on Bloomberg is probably unlikely to put their name beside X-rated content. In fact, Eat24 found that the only companies that advertised on porn sites were other porn sites and “natural male enhancement” sellers.

As a result, Eat24 said the advertising rates were dirt cheap. The company capitalized by pairing sexually suggestive banner ads (“BLT with your BDSM?”) alongside video landing pages. The viewers that saw the ads were, naturally, not dressed appropriately to go out in public, and likely to have worked up an appetite. In short, they were the perfect customers to order delivery from ! the comf ort of their own homes.

The campaign wound up being a whopping success. Eat24 said its adult site banner ads were able to get three times as many impressions as the ads they posted on Facebook, Google, and Twitter combined. And they did it at just 10% of the cost. What’s more, the company said 90% of the visitors the banners generated were coming to Eat24 for the first time.

It remains to be seen whether other non-adult companies will follow Eat24′s lead.


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Wednesday, September 11th, 2013 news No Comments

Here’s What We Know So Far About The Shutdown At The NASDAQ

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/confusion-over-the-nasdaq-2013-8

nasdaq omx

Trading on the NASDAQ halted Thursday afternoon due to a technical issue with something called UTP SIP quote dissemination.

UTP, or “unlisted trading privileges” refers to the ability of other exchanges to trade stocks on the NASDAQ and SIP (“securities information processor”) is the system by which NASDAQ sends quotes of those securities to other exchanges.

Exchange officials are scrambling to a) figure out what happened and b) resume trading safely. At this point, everyone is just confused. From the Wall Street Journal:

“It’s really shocking. We’re stuck,” said Ramon Verastegui, head of global engineering and strategy at Société Générale. “If we want to trade Apple, we can’t.”

With no new updates, CNBC pundits were locked in a talking heads decabox.

The “market is too complicated” and “ridiculously complex” said former Nasdaq Vice-Chair David Weild to CNBC.

Both the NYSE and the BATS Exchange stopped trading in all NASDAQ-listed Tape C securities, per NASDAQ’s request. Tape C securities are listed on the NASDAQ or NASDAQ Small Cap exchange.

NASDAQ now says it will resume trading between 2:45 and 3:10 ET, but it had been largely radio silent since its 1 PM alert:

NASDAQ intends to re-open trading in all Tape C securities with a halt cross wi! th a 5-m inute quote only period starting at a time to be determined.  NASDAQ will not be cancelling open orders on the book.  Customers who wish to cancel their orders may do so and any customer who wishes to not participate in the re-opening should cancel their orders prior to the resumption of trading. Additionally, NASDAQ will clear all stale quotes from the UTP SIP prior to the commencement of trading.

A low volume day should mean the NASDAQ can get back on its feet, according to CNBC. But we’re still waiting.