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Android surged to 69 percent smartphone share in 2012, dipped in Q4

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/02/14/idc-android-surged-to-69-percent-smartphone-share-in-2012/

IDC Android surged to 69 percent smartphone share in 2012, took a dip in Q4

Few would doubt that 2012 was Android’s year given how rapidly it grew, but it’s good to have some context. IDC is more than willing to oblige. It estimates that Google’s OS climbed from 49.2 percent of the smartphone space in 2011 to 68.8 percent in 2012. As we’ve seen in the past, though, most of that came from customers leaving embattled platforms, including a pre-BB10 BlackBerry and Symbian. Apple reportedly held its ground at 18.8 percent, while Microsoft appears to have turned a corner with Windows Phone by climbing back up to 2.5 percent.

The fourth quarter results paint a slightly different picture. Android still had a comfortable 70.1 percent of share in IDC’s reckoning, but it took a hit from 75 percent in the third quarter — similar to what we’ve seen elsewhere, the iPhone 5 launch helped iOS claw back enough share to hit 21 percent. BlackBerry and Windows Phone weren’t quite so rosy, although they also didn’t have full quarters with new devices to offer. We’ll have to wait for the first quarter of 2013 to finish before we learn of any true shakeups in the status quo.

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Source: IDC

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Thursday, February 14th, 2013 digital No Comments

Why Google Is The Grinch Who Stole Your Business

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-grinch-who-stole-your-business-2011-12


Google Sign

It’s that time of year when we all reflect on the past, search our souls and determine what we want for the next year. I’ve been reflecting on what it means to work with a company that controls so much of the market, provides such a broad set of capabilities and delivers such a large percentage of monthly revenues to publishers. Of course, I’m thinking of Google and what their dominance in the ad market means for a publisher’s future and its ability to remain relevant to marketers.

What do we know about Google? They are this great company that gives consumers some of the best digital products available on the Web: search, email, maps, Android, apps and more. This has catapulted Google to the rank of second most valuable brand, behind only Apple, according to Millward Brown. This seems to be great for consumers, but what about the businesses who are now reliant on Google for search and display revenue, advertising technology and various business applications like Google docs, Android OS, Chrome, etc.?

Many of the businesses I meet with hold Google in high regard because of the products they represent and the amount of revenue they provide. However, these businesses are equally concerned about Google’s consumer stranglehold, their influence over the ad ecosystem and their focus on automation, all of which lessens the publishers’ worth in the value chain as a whole. Google’s market dominance stretches well beyond search, which in itself is obviously enormous. This expansive dominance should be alarming for every marketing-related business, including publishers, advertisers and agency and marketing services technologies.  Here are a few stats on Google by category that will likely frighten even the largest of these businesses:

  • 65.38% Share of Search, Oct-11 Hitwise
  • 44.1% Share of Ad revenue, Oct-11 PCMag
  • 43.8% Share for Video, Oct-11 Comsccore
  • 30.03% Share for Travel, Oct-11 Comscore
  • 22.38% Share for Automotive, Oct-11 Comscore
  • 18.69% Share for Shopping, Oct-11 Comscore
  • 16.29% Share for Health, Oct-11 Comscore

If these stats weren’t enough to dampen your holiday spirit, Google now is even prioritizing their own products above the paid search listings on their search engine. This creates a major conflict for the advertisers that have made Google what it is today and may force those clients to pay even more if their advertising is to remain competitive in this new bidding landscape. Google clearly is leveraging its position of power with consumers to launch new products and ensure their own success. The latest example of this is the promotion of their Chrome browser on the Google homepage. As you can see from the chart below, Chrome is rocketing to the position of #1 browser, a rank it is projected to achieve by June 2012.

Google is now a major threat to every business in the publishing and advertising marketplace. In the short term, while they may appear to be a superior partner that provides revenue and marketing innovation, I believe that over the long term they are eroding the value of each and every business in the media sales and publishing value chain. And, worst of all, they are charging heavily for the privilege. I’d estimate that for every dollar spent by an advertiser in the media buying process, Google captures upwards of 25% in tolls (via their various ad services, DFA, Invite, DFP, AdX, Motif, Admeld, etc.), thereby minimizing revenue and profits for publishers and other vendors along the way

So as you reflect on 2011 and consider whom you want to partner with in 2012, give some thought to the short versus the long term. What is your value proposition to clients? And who do you ultimately want to run your business … the Grinch or You?

Have a great holiday and Happy New Year!

The views expressed here reflect the views of the author alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views of 24/7 Real Media, its affiliates, subsidiaries or its parent company, WPP plc

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Tuesday, December 27th, 2011 news No Comments

The Reason Why Publishers Started Putting Their Magazines on the iPad

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5801045/the-reason-why-publishers-started-putting-their-magazines-on-the-ipad

When Apple announced their digital subscription rules and locked down the iPad, publishers weren’t exactly rushing to bring their subscriptions over. And then all of a sudden Conde Nast, Hearst, and Time Inc brought their magazines to the iPad. What changed?

According to Forbes, the biggest hurdle for publishers wasn’t the 30% cut that Apple was going to take away from them, but rather the lack of information on the subscribers. They were worried that because users get to ‘opt in’ to giving up their personal information that nobody would do it. They were wrong. In fact, 50% of subscribers have been giving publishers their information.

Having that sort of basic subscriber info is necessary for publishers to do business. Now that they find Apple’s terms workable, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see more and more magazines come over to the iPad with agreeable deals. Which is a very good thing for people like me who prefer to read (and kill my eyes) on a screen. [Forbes]

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Wednesday, May 11th, 2011 news No Comments

Movie Tickets Reach $20

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5544536/movie-tickets-reach-20

Movie Tickets Reach Starting with Shrek Forever After, three AMC theaters in New York will begin selling $20 adult movie tickets on their IMAX screens. Even for a loose-moneyed film buff like me, that’s just too much.

After The Dark Knight, the industry realized just how much IMAX ticket prices could bolster profits. After Avatar and Alice In Wonderland, the same proved true, along with the enticement of 3D.

(Evidently, domestic grosses of $533,345,358, $748,590,960 and $331,666,06, respectively, weren’t enough for Hollywood—nor was the fact that Avatar made $120,000,000 just on IMAX screens, just in the US.)

So a more extreme version of gouging begins at theaters. And just as the public cried about $10 movie tickets while continuing to flood the theaters in droves, many will still pay $20 to see the latest Shrek, complaining about it until they forget that the world was ever any different.

But you know what? I won’t, not now or in the near future. And I’m about as fiscally irresponsible and movie obsessed as idiots come. That’s a bad sign for movie theaters and studios alike, as it means the more sane amongst you will bail on theaters for sure (if you haven’t already).

(Oh, but compared to movie theater popcorn, tickets are still pretty cheap!) [WSJ]

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Friday, May 21st, 2010 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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