Yahoo

ROI Rankings: Facebook Deemed More Important Than Twitter and LinkedIn, Less Than Google

source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/wp/interactive/roi-rankings-facebook-deemed-more-important-than-twitter-and-linkedin-less-than-google-36695/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

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After Facebook, Twitter (average rating of 3.04) was deemed the next-most important for ROI, followed by LinkedIn (3.38), Yahoo (4.23), and AOL (5.6).

Respondents – a mix of marketers of clients (26%), ad agency employees (30%), and media company employees and consultants (44%) – appear to be satisfied with the support provided by Facebook for their advertising efforts. Almost half believe that Facebook’s support for advertisers has improved to some degree over the past 6 months, compared to only 1 in 10 who believe it has to some extent deteriorated. Additionally, roughly three-quarters are very (10.5%) or somewhat (65.2%) satisfied with the data and analytic tracking they receive from Facebook.

Given improving ROI and support, it’s not surprising that advertisers will be increasing their efforts: over the next year, a majority expect to significantly (11.2%) or moderately (44.5%) increase their Facebook advertising budget.

Interestingly, although Facebook is deriving an increasing share of ad revenues from mobile, advertisers don’t see much separation between the RO! I of mobi! le and desktop ads, with a plurality (38%) rating them about the same. Slightly more than one-third feel that mobile ROI is much (7.7%) or somewhat (27.4%) greater, while 26.9% feel the same way about desktop ROI.

There’s more consensus when it comes to Facebook Exchange, used by about 1 in 5 respondents. Of those, two-thirds said it has been somewhat effective for their campaigns, with another 1 in 5 calling it very effective.

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Tuesday, September 17th, 2013 news No Comments

‘It’s Treason’ For Yahoo To Disobey The NSA (YHOO)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/marissa-mayer-its-treason-to-ignore-the-nsa-2013-9

Melissa Mayer Yahoo

Marissa Mayer was on stage on Wednesday at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference when Michael Arrington asked her about NSA snooping.

He wanted to know what would happen if Yahoo just didn’t cooperate. He wanted to know what would happen if she were to simply talk about what was happening, even though the government had forbidden it.

“Releasing classified information is treason. It generally lands you incarcerated,” she said, clearly uncomfortable with the turn of the conversation.

She also explained that when the government comes calling wanting information on Yahoo users, the company scrutinizes each request and “we push back a lot on requests.” But “we can’t talk about those things because they’re classified,” she said.

This has been going on long before her reign, too, she said:

“I’m proud to be part of an organization that from the very beginning in 2007, with the NSA and FISA and PRISM, has been skeptical and has scrutinized those requests. In 2007 Yahoo filed a lawsuit against the new Patriot Act, parts of PRISM and FISA, we were the key plaintiff. A lot of people have wondered about that case and who it was. It was us … we lost. The thing is, we lost and if you don’t comply it’s treason.”