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The Two Cellphone Makers That Might Be Shopping For An OS Next

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-lg-sony-ericsson-2011-8

So far this year, two of the leading mobile phone makers have struck deals with tech giants to adapt to the change from feature phones to smartphones.

Nokia announced a partnership with Microsoft in February and said that all future Nokia smartphones will be powered by Windows Phone. There were even rumors that Microsoft might acquire the Finnish company.

In a surprise move, Google bought Motorola this month.

Looking at a chart of mobile vendors’ operating margins from Asymco, there are two other mobile phone companies who are suffering under the onslaught of the iPhone: LG and Sony-Ericsson.

The options for these companies include diversification to more platforms, trying to strike a deeper relationship with either Microsoft or Google, or getting out of the phone business entirely.

chart of the day, lg, sony ericsson, aug 2011

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Saturday, August 27th, 2011 news No Comments

Google shutters Slide, founder Max Levchin moves to greener pastures

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/08/26/google-shutters-slide-founder-max-levchin-moves-to-greener-past/

It’s been barely a year since Google acquired Slide for a cool $200 million, but today comes news that the Mountain View crew has decided to dissolve its social apps unit, and that renowned entrepreneur Max Levchin will be leaving the company to “pursue other opportunities.” Sources close to the matter told All Things D that the decision was announced at an internal staff meeting yesterday afternoon, and that most of Slide’s 100 employees will likely shift over to YouTube. A Google spokesperson later confirmed that the unit will in fact be shuttered, but didn’t reveal further details of where the displaced employees will land, saying only that the majority will remain onboard. Google didn’t offer a concrete explanation for the decision, though Slide had been acting as a largely autonomous and peripheral branch, and was never fully integrated into the company’s larger social team. Its apps, moreover, never really took off, and are due to be phased out over the course of the next few months — including tools like SuperPoke Pets, Disco and Photovine. And then, of course, there’s Levchin — the man who founded the company just a few years after co-founding PayPal, and who currently serves as Yelp’s chairman of the board. His immediate plans remain unclear, though we and the rest of the tech world will certainly be keeping a close eye on him, wherever he lands next.

Google shutters Slide, founder Max Lev! chin mov es to greener pastures originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 26 Aug 2011 03:27:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Friday, August 26th, 2011 news No Comments

Android Devs Can Now Start Optimizing Their Apps For Google TV

Source: http://techcrunch.com/2011/08/22/android-devs-can-now-start-optimizing-their-apps-for-google-tv/

google-tv6-m

Last fall, Google made its first attempt to take over your living room with the launch of Google TV — a platform that merged the web with television content to create an experience promising to usher in a new era of convenience and interactivity.

Unfortunately it’s been mostly a dud thus far. The platform’s overly-complex user interface and content issues (some major channels specifically block access to their websites from Google TV devices) has led to weak adoption. Google is reportedly working to give the platform a major revamp, and there’s at least one more bright light in its future: soon, Google TV will support Android applications.

Now, Google’s been promising that the platform would be receiving Android support ever since it was first announced, but up until now there hasn’t been a strong indication as to when that’d actually happen (the most specific Google’s gotten has been “summer”). Today, we’re one big step closer to seeing that promise come fruition: Google has just released a preview version of a Google TV plug-in for the Android SDK.

This doesn’t mean that you can install Android apps yet. Rather, it means developers can start to tweak their existing Android apps for the so-called ’10 foot experience’, so that their apps will be ready once the Google TV update does ship to users.

From the Android blog:

These are still early days for Google TV, and this release is another step in providing developer tools for the big screen. While the number of apps available on TV will initially be small, we expect that through this early release of the add-on you’ll be able to bring optimized TV apps into the ecosystem more quickly. To start doing this, download the Google TV add-on today. Also, please continue to reach out to us on the Google TV Android Developer Community forum. We look forward to your contributions!


Company:
GOOGLE
Launch Date:
7/9/1998
IPO:
25/8/2004, NASDAQ:GOOG

Google provides search and advertising services, which together aim to organize and monetize the world’s information. In addition to its dominant search engine, it offers a plethora of…

Learn more

Company:
ANDROID

In July 2005, Google acquired Android, a small startup company based in Palo Alto, CA. Android’s co-founders who went to work at Google included Andy Rubin (co-founder of…

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Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011 news No Comments

The State of HTML5 Validation According to Tristan Louis

Source: http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/08/the-state-of-html5-validation.php

tristanlouis150.pngTristan Louis is a colleague and insightful analyst. Over the weekend, he took a look at the top 20 sites according to Alexa and ran them through the W3C HTML validator to see who is playing by the rules and who still has some catching up to do.

Surprisingly, MSN.com was the sole site among the top 20 to completely pass, and Amazon had the most page errors – more than 500 of them with more than 100 particular warnings – “showing that dis­regard for standard com­pliance does not seem to have an impact on economic performance,” he says in his blog post.

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Most of the top 20 sites have adopted the UTF-8 encoding type that supports multiple languages by default.

While the W3C validator isn’t the last word (or even the first word) when it comes to HTML5 accuracy (as we have covered before here), it is an interesting comparative metric.

Louis then went on to examine the code of many top Web 2.0 companies to see how they compared. All of them are using UTF-8, and all of them had errors with the validator. Only five out of the 11 sites have made the transition to HTML5, with the rest using XHTML or HTML v4. As he says, “It looks like there is still much room for improve­ment in the world of HTML validation.”

Discuss


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Monday, August 22nd, 2011 news No Comments

People Only Want iPads (AAPL, HPQ, RIMM, GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-ipad-tablets-2011-8

In light of HP’s decision to get out of the WebOS tablet making business, we’re highlighting this chart published at the NYT, via wealth management and analysis firm Robert W. Baird.

As you can see, people are pretty much only interested in iPads right now. They don’t want tablets running Android, or any other operating system. They want iPads. Until someone does something mind blowing with its software, or hardware, we don’t expect this to change any time soon.

chart of the day, tablets, aug 2011

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Monday, August 22nd, 2011 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5832677/how-to-win-every-single-time-you-have-a-shitty-groupon-experience-or-redeem-coupons-after-they-expire

How to Win Every Single Time You Have a Shitty Groupon Experience (Or! Redeem Coupons After They Expire)The inherent problem with voucher sites like Groupon is that you pay up front, so if a merchant screws you or won’t accept a coupon, you’re very probably stuck dealing with the voucher site. Enter Voucher Complaints.

Put together by Harvard Biz School assistant professor Ben Edelman, it generates complaint letters based on your situation—and this is the killer part—based on your location, because laws vary from state to state. For instance, did you know you might be able to redeem an expired coupon in Massachusetts for the full face value? Check out this hardcore noise:

I have a concern about the expiration date on my voucher. I tried to use the voucher after the listed expiration date, and the merchant told me I could redeem only a lower value, not the full face value shown on the voucher. Under Massachusetts law, your voucher is a gift certificate. (Specifically, the law states: 255.1: “A gift certificate shall include… any other medium that evidences the giving of consideration in exchange for the right to redeem the certificate, electronic card or other medium for goods, food, services… of at least an equal value” (http://bit.ly/mf4SSH MGL §255.1).) According to Massachusetts law, a gift certificate may not lose value due to dormancy (MGL §266.75D). In particular, see Massachusetts 266.75D: “Whoever sells or offers to sell a gift certificate, as defined in section 1 of chapter 255D, which imposes dormancy fees, latency fees, administrative fees, periodic fees, service fees or other fees that have the effect of reducing the total value amount for which the holder may redeem such gift certificate, shall be punished by a fine of not more than $300 per violation” (http://bit.ly/lw8kV0 MGL §266.75D). Thus, the reduction in value is not permissible.

Give it a whirl. [Voucher Complaints via The Bad Deal via Eater]

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Friday, August 19th, 2011 Uncategorized No Comments

CPG Clear Leader in Online Video Spending

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/direct/cpg-clear-leader-in-online-video-spending-18896/

The CPG channel is the clear leader in online video ad spending, according to [pdf] Q1 2011 statistics from online ad server YuMe. The YuMe Q1 2011 Video Advertising Metrics Report indicates the CPG category accounted for 28% of online video ad spending during the quarter.

Telecom, the number two category in terms of ad spend, […]

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Friday, August 19th, 2011 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5831772/the-patent-cold-wars-visualized

The Patent Cold War, VisualizedIt’s one thing to say that everybody is suing everybody over mobile patents. It’s another entirely when you actually see the battle lines all drawn out for you, as Thomson Reuters has so painstakingly done here. Full melee below:

The Patent Cold War, VisualizedWhat’s maybe most striking about this overdue (and more readable) update to a similar NY Times infographic from March 2010 is how little has been resolved since then—and how much more has been initiated.

The simplest way to read it: each one of those red and blue lines represents an arrow straight to the heart of innovation. And these companies’ quivers, apparently, are still very full. [ThomsonReuters]

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Wednesday, August 17th, 2011 news No Comments

Source: http://gizmodo.com/5831022/googles-16-biggest-acquisitions-so-farand-what-happened-to-them

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To ThemGoogle’s $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola will be its biggest acquisition ever — more than four times the size of DoubleClick, the previous leader.

But over the last decade, Google has been one of the biggest—and most successful—acquirers in the tech industry, and owes a lot of its success to these smart buys. Its core search advertising platform and most of its biggest new businesses, including Android, YouTube, and display advertising, all come from other companies.

Here’s Google’s top 16 acquisitions by value and show what happened to them.


Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#16: Android mobile platform, “up to” $50 million (estimated)

Last October, Google M&A chief David Lawee called the 2005 acquisition of Android—the mobile phone platform started by ex-Danger leader Andy Rubin—its “best deal ever.” Less than three years after launch, it has become the most popular smartphone platform in the world.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#15: Aardvark social search, $50 million

 Google paid about $50 million for social search Q&A service Aardvark in February 2010, but hasn’t really done much with it yet. However, there are hints in Google+ code that suggest that Aardvark — or what’s left of it — will soon be integrated into Google’s new social network.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#14: Jambool social payment platform, $70 million

 Google bought this mobile-payment platform in August 2010. Onlookers assumed it would be part of Google’s social networking efforts. In fact, the team was put to work on in-app payments, and earlier this month Google said it would shut down the Jambool Social Gold service in May, and replace it with its own in-app payment system.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#13: Invite Media ad platform, $81 million

 Google bought this ad technology company last June, making its 24-year-old founder Nat Turner a young millionaire. Invite is a demand-side platform (DSP), which helps ad buyers place their wares on ad exchanges, and hasn’t yet been integrated into Google’s other ad-buying products. Google recently wrote a blog post explaining when advertisers should use Invite versus the Google Display Network.

#12: Feedburner RSS tools, $100 million

 In Jue 2007, Google paid $100 million for this company, which creates tools for advertisers and users to manage RSS feeds. It’s still around, but RSS has become less interesting in the wake of Twitter — which is now run by former Feedburner founder Dick Costolo.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#11: Like.com visual search, $100 million+

 Google bought this visual search company last summer, and put the team to work building a search vertical for women’s fashion called Boutiques.com.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#9 (tie): Applied Semantics, $102 million

 David Lawee may think Android is Google’s best acquisition, but from a pure ROI perspective it’s hard to beat Applied Semantics, which built AdSense — the paid search advertising platform that’s still responsible for most of Google’s revenue and profits.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#9 (tie): dMarc automated radio ad placement, $102 million

 This one was a mistake: in 2006, Google paid $102 million for this platform for automatic placement of radio ads, and offered a whopping guarantee of up to $1.1 billion based on performance. But the business never took off, and Google shut the program down in mid-2009.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#8: On2 video compression, $133 million

 Google tried to buy this video compression company for $106 million, but its shareholders held out for a higher price and eventually got $133 million in January 2010. Last summer, Google announced it would open-source the VP8 video codec it acquired with On2, and rename it WebM. Google has since tried to push WebM as a replacement for H.264, a much more widely used standard for Web video.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#7: Slide social gaming, $228 million (estimated)

 Google bought the social gaming company behind SuperPoke last August for $228 million (the price was originally reported at $182 million). Slide still operates as a separate entity within Google, and doesn’t seem to be contributing much to Google+, the company’s new social networking initiative. Instead, it’s out there creating standalone mobile products like photo-sharing app Photovine.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#6: Admeld, real-time bidding exchange for online advertising, $400 million (if regulators let it go through)

 Google announced plans to buy Admeld in June to boost its display advertising business. Regulators announced last month that they’re taking a close look at the deal, but that doesn’t mean it will be blocked — regulators also took a second look at ITA and DoubleClick, and both of those deals eventually closed.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#5: Postini email security and services, $625 million

 Google bought this company in June 2007 and integrated its add-on email services, like spam-blocking and archiving, into Gmail for business users. It’s been a critical part of Google’s enterprise apps business ever since.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#4: ITA travel service, $700 million

 Google made a $700 million bid for ITA, which compiles flight information for airlines, travel agencies — and rival search engines. The bid garnered complaints from competitors who rely on ITA’s service, but the feds eventually approved it with conditions.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#3: AdMob mobile advertising, $750 million

 Android is all about increasing mobile search usage today, but Google hopes to make mobile advertising in general into a huge business. That’s why it paid $750 million for AdMob in November 2009. Since then, however, AdMob execs have left — including former CEO Omar Hamoui (pictured here) — and sources have said the integration isn’t going so well.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#2: YouTube video sharing site, $1.65 billion

 It looks like a no-brainer now, but when Google bought the video-sharing service in 2009, it was a huge risk: YouTube was full of copyrighted content that users uploaded without permission, and faced potentially billions in lawsuits. Google skillfully negotiated contracts with content owners and instituted a reasonable takedown policy, and as a result YouTube has thrived — analysts estimate it’s now profitable and earns more than $1 billion a year. This year, Google is increasing headcount by 30% and is hiring tons of new ad sales people.

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To Them

#1: DoubleClick display ad technology, $3.1 billion

 The 2007 acquisition of DoubleClick launched Google into the display advertising business. It’s been a mixed bag. Google boasts that it’s making $2.5 billion a year from display, but about $1 billion of that is from YouTube. Also, display advertising isn’t nearly as profitable for Google as its core search advertising business. Still, display advertising is a big business, and Google has to be in it. Buying DoubleClick was a lot faster and easier than building a display business from scratch.

Now, check out what Google will get from its biggest acquisition ever: Here’s Everything Google Just Bought From Motorola For $12.5 Billion

Google's 16 Biggest Acquisitions So Far—And What Happened To ThemRepublished with permission from The Business Insider

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Monday, August 15th, 2011 Uncategorized No Comments

Comscore finds 6.2 percent of smartphone users scan QR codes

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/08/13/comscore-finds-6-2-percent-of-smartphone-users-scan-qr-codes/

QR codes may be turning up in more places than ever these days, but are people actually using them? According to market research firm Comscore, at least some of them are — 14 million in June in the US alone, to be specific, or about 6.2 percent of all smartphone users. As for who makes up that slice of the smartphone market, Comscore says that just over 60 percent are male, 53 percent are between the ages of 18 and 34, and 36 percent have a household income of $100k or more. Folks are also apparently more likely to scan QR codes at home than at a retail store, and magazines and newspapers edge out websites or product packaging when it comes to the top source of the QR code being scanned. So, not exactly an explosion in use, but still fairly impressive for a weird-looking barcode that was rarely seen outside of Japan until a few years ago.

Comscore finds 6.2 percent of smartphone users scan QR codes originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 13 Aug 2011 07:55:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sunday, August 14th, 2011 news No Comments

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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