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drag2share: How 4 Major Companies Revitalized Their Brands By Being Great To Their Customers On Social Media

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/Ondy6msTAsM/social-media-for-brand-customer-service-2013-8

Customer Service I

Most brands offer dreadful customer service on social media. A study from Socialbakers, a social media analytics company, found that response times have actually worsened recently, instead of improving, as the chart shows. But a few companies are doing great things with social media, and helping to recast their companies as customer-centric organizations.

In several cases, companies facing crises or PR disasters actually came out looking better after using social media to tackle problems head-on.

In a new report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s paid research service, we explore how companies are interacting more effectively and serving customers better with a focus on social media, and recreating themselves in the process.

Gain instant access to this report by signing up for a free trial of BI Intelligence >

Here are a few examples of great social media customer focus that has created value for companies across industries:

  1. Dell: The computer technology corporation was an early adopter of social customer relationship management and in 2010, Dell opened up its soci! al media command center to all employees, regardless of their function. By 2011, Dell had trained over 25,000 employees of its employees in “social listening.” These employees now monitor over 25,000 social mentions of the company daily in 11 different languages. This means insights gleaned from social media are spread throughout the organization rather than being “hoarded,” or remaining undigested in one department.
  2. Domino’s: A disastrous YouTube video posted in 2009 showed two Domino’s employees mishandling a pizza. After the video went viral, the company launched a massive campaign to analyze public opinion across all social media. After receiving negative feedback, Domino’s made company-wide changes including altering their pizza recipe, aggressively reaching out to customers on social media, and launching a marketing campaign acknowledging mistakes and promising a better product. Domino’s saw a 14% increase in sales the quarter immediately following the campaign. The stock price took off, and Domino’s has never looked back.
  3. Best Buy: The electronics retailer unrolled a Twitter-focused marketing and customer service strategy built around “Twelpforce,” a system the company created to allow thousands of employees across departments to receive and respond to customer queries via Twitter. While Twelpforce has been a hit with customers, it also gave employees a channel and an incentive to collaborate internally and operate outside of silos (in order to handle customer requests it was often necessary to gather information from other employees.)
  4. American Airlines: Socialbakers recently began ranking industries and brands according to “social devotion,” or how attentive they are to customers on Twitter. Surprisingly, troubled America! n Airlin es ranks ninth among all U.S. brands (American has a response rate of 94%). Jan Reza, CEO of Socialbakers, believes this has to do with a lesson learned from Superstorm Sandy. Finding they had to deal with a system-wide near shutdown, American Airlines turned to social media to manage the crisis. They’ve remained faithful to social media channels ever since.


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

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Friday, August 30th, 2013 news No Comments

drag2share: Facebook Is Riddled With Click Farms Where Workers Generate 1,000 Likes For $1

source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/businessinsider/~3/xJLbpbXoNgE/how-low-paid-workers-at-click-farms-create-appearance-of-online-popularity-2013-8

the guardianHow much do you like courgettes, the green vegetable Americans call zucchini? According to one Facebook page devoted to them, hundreds of people find them delightful enough to click the “like” button – even with dozens of other pages about courgettes to choose from.

There’s just one problem: the liking was fake, done by a team of low-paid workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh, whose boss demanded just $15 per thousand “likes” at his “click farm”. Workers punching the keys might be on a three-shift system, and be paid as little as $120 a year.

The ease with which a humble vegetable could win approval calls into question the basis on which many modern companies measure success online – through Facebook likes, YouTube video views and Twitter followers.


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

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Friday, August 2nd, 2013 news No Comments

That AT&T Video Of A High School Football Player Doing A Flip Over An Opponent Is FAKE

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/att-video-of-high-school-football-flip-is-fake-2012-11

AT&T is currently airing a great commercial featuring what appears to be amateur video of a high school football player dodging a tackle by performing a head-over-heels flip, before landing on his feet to make a touchdown.

But the flip was faked.

The ad is based on a YouTube video titled “High school scrimmage flip (hello!)” that has been seen by nearly 800,000 people. Here it is:

The ad, made by BBDO Atlanta, purports to tell the tale of what happened to the nameless player after that video went viral, and he is introduced to a college talent scout. Here’s the ad:

But AgencySpy recently called out the original video as fake, simply because it was made into an ad by BBDO. The video was published on YouTube on October 2; AT&T’s version appeared on October 27.

Business Insider can confirm, however, that the backflip was staged, and not a real video caught by a fan at a local game.

The account holder of the original video is “S.Mc.Yahoo! Sports figured out that the account belongs to someone called Stephen McMennamy. That’s because there is a Google+ account for “S.Mc.” which lists a “Stephen McMennamy” as the holder of the YouTube account that uploaded the video.

Neither account has any more information than that.

Stephen McMennamyBut over on LinkedIn, it turns out that Stephen McMennamy is the creative director for BBDO Atlanta.

What are the odds that McMennamy was the one who owned the original rights to this stunning piece of high school sports video before it was made into an ad by AT&T?

We contacted a BBDO spokesperson and he confessed that the video was in fact staged for AT&T.

It’s a cute ad. And seeding a fake “amateur” video on YouTube for more than a month before airing the ad that pays homage to it was strategic genius. But it ain’t real.

Related:

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Sunday, November 4th, 2012 news No Comments

How To Block Ads On YouTube And 6 Other Cool Tricks (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/best-youtube-plugins-2012-8

A college girl sings about YouTube editing

We love YouTube, but there’s a lot we’d change about it, too.

The ads are a little too obtrusive for us, we’d love to set a default video quality, and the famously obnoxious comments are often better left out completely.

Thankfully there are browser plugins that make it a snap to change the way you interact with the definitive video-sharing site for the better.

Stop YouTube videos from autoplaying

If you’d rather manually start YouTube videos yourself, a plugin called Flashblock can do the trick. It will keep all Flash videos from playing until you click on it.

It’s a little complicated though — it does this for all Flash video, no matter what site it appears on.

Still undeterred? Get it here >




YouTube High Definition

YouTube High Definition is a plugin that automatically plays videos at the highest possible quality. You don’t have to toggle the quality from the control panel on each YouTube video you watch.

Get it here >




Use AdBlock Plus to get rid of YouTube comments in Firefox

Adblock Plus is already one of the best plugins for killing ads on the web. But it has anot! her grea t application as well — crushing those vitriolic YouTube comments into dust.

Lifehacker offers the following instructions on how to make it work:

On Adblock Plus…just head to YouTube, click on the Adblock icon in your navigation bar, and hit “Easy Create Filter”. Then, just click on one of the comments and it should highlight all of them. After hitting “Add”, you should be free of YouTube comments forever.

Get it here >



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Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012 news No Comments

HTC details micro arc oxidation, says your One S will be strong enough to forgo the case (video)

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/03/13/htc-details-micro-arc-oxidation-says-your-one-s-will-be-strong/

Happen to recall the gorgeous metal HTC’s using on its upcoming One S to surround its Ice Cream Sandwich-loaded core? To refresh your memory, the ceramic look and feel of its metal unibody shell is created using a process known as micro arc oxidation — and HTC’s highlighting how the magic happens in its latest YouTube video. According to the company, the shell (made from aircraft-grade aluminium) gets slammed with a whopping “10,000 volts of energy,” causing a reaction that quickly leads to the black color and smooth texture. Notably, HTC points out that this is actually a treatment to the metal, rather than a finish on top of it. That’s not all — the metal also ends up being nearly five-times stronger as a result. Want to see the zapping for yourself? You’ll find the clip and more details in the flick just after the break.

Continue reading HTC details micro arc oxidation, says your One S will be strong enough to forgo the case (video)

HTC details micro arc oxidation, says your One S will be strong enough to forgo the case (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 13 Mar 2012 22:29:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Wednesday, March 14th, 2012 news No Comments

The Half-Life Of A YouTube Video Is 6 Days (GOOG)

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-the-lifecycle-of-a-youtube-video-2010-5

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A video on YouTube gets 50% of its views in the first 6 days it is on the site, according to data from analytics firm TubeMogul. After 20 days, a YouTube video has had 75% of its total views.

That’s a really short life span for YouTube videos, and it’s probably getting shorter. In 2008, it took 14 days for a video to get 50% of its views and 44 days to get 75% of its views.

Why? In the last two years, YouTube has improved its user interface, which helps videos get seen early on. Also, the world has gotten more adept at embedding and sharing videos in real-time via Twitter and Facebook. (And there’s probably more video to choose from.)

What’s this mean for publishers? For one thing, publishers should have advertising/monetization schemes ready to go for their videos right when they’re published, because the hits come early.

It also means companies should be actively uploading videos to YouTube, says David Burch, a rep at TubeMogul. He notes that major companies like the NBA have been good at getting clips on YouTube quickly. If they didn’t act fast, then they could miss an opportunity to get eyeballs.

chart of the day, youtube video lifecycle, may 2010

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Friday, May 28th, 2010 news No Comments

Like I said… viral videos can be made

Take a home video like this one (posted January 24, 2007) – 1.1 million views

make it more extreme like this (posted August 03, 2009) – 2.7 million views

Promote the heck out of it through paid media and traditional PR support (i.e. seed it to every gullible news outlet) and let them put it on the news (for free).   And be sure to cover your tracks by turning off “statistics and data” on the YouTube video so people can’t back track where you promoted the video.

Unfortunately for Microsoft, no one will ever know if this viral video drove any sales like the JKWeddingDance one did for Chris Brown’s single “Forever” which hit the top of the sales charts on iTunes and Amazon MP3 the same week.

The JKWeddingDance video was real; the viral effect was MANUFACTURED – Post 1 of 2

How to manufacture a viral video sensation and make viral profits – Post 2 of 2

Here are a few more funny videos for your entertainment.



and an external link

http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/scary-rides/precocious-kids-mess-with-tracks-of-an-oncoming-train-327400.php

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Wednesday, August 26th, 2009 digital 1 Comment

Dr. Augustine Fou is Digital Consigliere to marketing executives, advising them on digital strategy and Unified Marketing(tm). Dr Fou has over 17 years of in-the-trenches, hands-on experience, which enables him to provide objective, in-depth assessments of their current marketing programs and recommendations for improving business impact and ROI using digital insights.

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